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 Post subject: Word of the Day
PostPosted: Thu Oct 08, 2009 2:59 pm 
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These are kind of fun - if you have any you want to add, a colorful word you hadn't seen before, or just a good word for writing, add them in this thread.

plod (plawd) - (verb) To move or walk heavily or laboriously.
Synonyms: footslog, pad, slog, tramp, trudge
Usage: A pair of tired mules plodded in a circle around a grindstone.

(Source: Google Word of the Day)

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Last edited by Raya on Fri Oct 09, 2009 1:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 09, 2009 1:28 pm 
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Another, for today:

convivial
\kuhn-VIV-ee-uhl\ , adjective:
1.Fond of feasting, drinking, and good company; sociable.
2.Merry; festive.

Quotes:

For the next hour they talked proper nouns. The hillbilly station continued full blast. Rachel opened a quart of beer for herself and things soon grew convivial.
-- Thomas Pynchon, V.

He hated to drink to excess, disliked convivial entertaining and had no gift for bonhomie.
-- Stella Tillyard, Citizen Lord

Young Sam, steeped in the family's endless storytelling, confessions, musings about their aspirations, and bickering about politics, seemed destined to become happy and convivial.
-- Andrew Hoffman, Inventing Mark Twain

Origin: Convivial comes from Latin convivium, "a feast, entertainment, a banquet," from conviva, "a table-companion, a guest," from convivere, "to live with, hence to feast with," from com-, con-, with + vivere, "to live."

(Source: Dictionary.com)

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Last edited by Kallysti on Fri Oct 09, 2009 1:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 09, 2009 1:33 pm 
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Nice one, Kally - and well laid out! - I think I will change the subject title, so any word of the day can be put up without contravening the subject :P

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 09, 2009 1:35 pm 
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Yeah, I just now edited mine to put the source in ;)

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 13, 2009 12:57 pm 
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Well, I don't see too many of us using today's wotd in our writing but c/o dictionary.com, it's:

triskaidekaphobia
\tris-ky-dek-uh-FOH-bee-uh\ , noun:
1.Fear or a phobia concerning the number 13.

Quotes:
Thirteen people, pledged to eliminate triskaidekaphobia, fear of the number 13, today tried to reassure American sufferers by renting a 13 ft plot of land in Brooklyn for 13 cents . . . a month.
-- Daily Telegraph, January 14, 1967

Origin:
Triskaidekaphobia is from Greek treiskaideka, triskaideka, thirteen (treis, three + kai, and + deka, ten) + phobos, fear.

Some famous triskaidekaphobes:
Napoleon
Herbert Hoover
Mark Twain
Richard Wagner
Franklin Roosevelt
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I thought it was cute for the folks listed at the end, lol.

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 13, 2009 1:06 pm 
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Love that word, Kally! I never heard of it before until I was faced with writing an article for Vanguard Ten Ton Hammer and Friday the 13th was coming up. So I looked it up and found that word and wrote a piece on superstitious gamers who won't play the game on that day. People were intrigued with the thought of triskaidekaphobia. It was a very popular article - had lots of hits :P

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 13, 2009 1:19 pm 
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Kallysti wrote:
Well, I don't see too many of us using today's wotd in our writing but c/o dictionary.com, it's:

triskaidekaphobia
\tris-ky-dek-uh-FOH-bee-uh\ , noun:
1.Fear or a phobia concerning the number 13.

Quotes:
Thirteen people, pledged to eliminate triskaidekaphobia, fear of the number 13, today tried to reassure American sufferers by renting a 13 ft plot of land in Brooklyn for 13 cents . . . a month.
-- Daily Telegraph, January 14, 1967

Origin:
Triskaidekaphobia is from Greek treiskaideka, triskaideka, thirteen (treis, three + kai, and + deka, ten) + phobos, fear.

Some famous triskaidekaphobes:
Napoleon
Herbert Hoover
Mark Twain
Richard Wagner
Franklin Roosevelt
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I thought it was cute for the folks listed at the end, lol.


Anyone with this fear would be appalled by my PO Box number 1313 ROFL!!!!


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 14, 2009 11:43 am 
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Yeah, I've heard there are even hotels who don't have a "13th floor" (they'll go from 12 with 14 right above) because so many superstitious people won't stay on it, lol. That's just silly!
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Hey, I learned a new word today! Don't know if I'll ever use it but it's:

pukka
\PUHK-uh\ , adjective:

1.Authentic; genuine.
2.Superior; first-class.

Quotes:
He talks like the quintessential pukka Englishman and quotes Chesterton and Kipling by the yard and yet he has chosen to live most of his adult life abroad.
-- Lynn Barber, "Bell book...and then what?"

Origin:
Pukka comes from Hindi pakka, "cooked, ripe," from Sanskrit pakva-, from pacati, "he cooks."

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 14, 2009 12:39 pm 
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Yeah, this word comes to us from the British rule in India. Officers of the British Army went there in the latter half of the 18th century and first half of the 19th century and fell in love with the country - stayed to raise their families there, etc.

The term pukka sahib was applied to these men. When they retired, many of them returned home and inserted the two terms into customary usage in Britain. It was the fashion in the late 1800s and early 1900s to describe a gentleman as pukka. It wasn't so often used to describe females, but everyone knew exactly what was meant if you referred to, say, Sir John as quite the pukka gentleman.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2009 7:06 pm 
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fetor
\FEE-tuhr; FEE-tor\ , noun:
1.A strong, offensive smell; stench.

Quotes:
Inside it's pitch black & the air is hot & wet with the sweet fetor of rotting grass.
-- Peter Blegvad, "The Free Lunch", Chicago Review, June 22, 1999

Origin:
Fetor comes from Latin foetor, from foetere, "to stink."

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2009 10:28 pm 
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Wow, a word I never heard of before! Yayyyy, will have to find a way to use it in Barash :P It would fit there.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 19, 2009 9:50 am 
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I'd never heard "fetor" before either, though I assume the root is the same as "fetid"? Anyway! Here's today's c/o dictionary.com:

fugacious
\fyoo-GAY-shuhs\ , adjective:
1.Lasting but a short time; fleeting.

Quote:
As the rain conspires with the wind to strip the fugacious glory of the cherry blossoms, it brings a spring delicacy to our dining table.
--Sarah Mori, "A spring delicacy", Malaysian Star

Origin:
Fugacious is derived from Latin fugax, fugac-, "ready to flee, flying; hence, fleeting, transitory," from fugere, "to flee, to take flight." Other words derived from the same root include fugitive, one who flees, especially from the law; refuge, a place to which to flee back (re-, "back"), and hence to safety; and fugue, literally a musical "flight."

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 19, 2009 10:22 am 
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ANOTHER one I haven't heard of. My cockiness about my knowledge of the English language is slowly diminishing :P Still, it is good to learn new words in your native tongue - it keeps one from getting too smug ;) One might say my cockiness is fugacious :twisted:

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 19, 2009 10:31 am 
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In high school, senior class AP composition, our teacher gave us words like this (I didn't know this one in particular, though) each week and we had to use them in assignments throughout that week. We also got extra credit if we found the words in something we were reading at the time (books, newspapers, etc). You know, I really didn't like the teacher but damned if I didn't learn a ton of words (and a ton of English rules, etc) from her.

I'm tempted to use this last one in my writing, I really like it...but the last reading I did for my writers' group I was already asked what my intended audience was because of my language (as in "smarty pants words" not as in swearing, lol). Though it helps to keep in mind that I live in blue collar Kingman, where there's not a (non-community) college in more than 100 mile radius :P

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 19, 2009 10:57 am 
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Well, it's nice to know these words, but really one of the cardinal rules of writing popular fiction is to keep it simple. Unless you have a character whom you are trying to portray as very well-educated or a word fanatic (like Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe), it's better to keep it to the ten-cent words, rather than the two-dollar words :P

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