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 Post subject: Re: Word of the Day
PostPosted: Sun Mar 06, 2011 11:20 pm 
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It sort of makes sense, if you think of the word over like 'better,' but that's stretching it a bit. Literally, it gets used incorrectly a lot. It's sort of become an English word with a slightly different meaning.

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 Post subject: Re: Word of the Day
PostPosted: Mon Mar 07, 2011 11:48 am 
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Perhaps, but every time I hear someone misuse the word, I get the impression of visiting friends and having your three year old start running around their coffee table shouting an expletive repetitively at the top of his lungs.

He has no idea what the word means, but is proud to have learned how to say it, so he provides social embarassment for you and there is no way to get him to stop saying it without firmly imbedding the word in his brain.

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 Post subject: Re: Word of the Day
PostPosted: Wed Mar 09, 2011 10:05 pm 
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english uses it as a slang word. It is in NO way considered a formal word. I would not use it while speaking with someone unless it is with a group of friends over vent or chat and its video game related. I honestly think the word sounds stupid if used for other purposes, ie. "thats an uber shirt dude". Yeap I hear that and think IQ -10.

Heres what webster has to say on it http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/uber


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 Post subject: Re: Word of the Day
PostPosted: Fri Mar 11, 2011 8:21 am 
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I'm laughing at wunderkind, when I saw it the first thought was "Wunderland", a planet in Larry Niven's Known Space universe. Had no idea it was based on a real word.


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 Post subject: Re: Word of the Day
PostPosted: Tue Mar 15, 2011 8:37 am 
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blandishment
\ BLAN-dish-muhnt \ , noun;
1. Speech or action that flatters and tends to coax, entice, or persuade; allurement -- often used in the plural.

Quote:
But she had not risen at all to the law fellow's blandishments, his attempts to interest her in his ideas and persuade her to set forth her own.
-- John Bayley, Elegy for Iris

Origin:
Blandishment ultimately comes from Latin blandiri, "to flatter, caress, coax," from blandus, "flattering, mild."
__________

A nice, functional word :)

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 Post subject: Re: Word of the Day
PostPosted: Wed Mar 16, 2011 1:08 pm 
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apposite
\ AP-uh-zit \ , adjective;
1. Being of striking appropriateness and relevance; very applicable; apt.

Quote:
As we survey Jewish history as a whole from the vantage point of the late twentieth century, Judah Halevi's phrase "prisoner of hope" seems entirely apposite. The prisoner of hope is sustained and encouraged by his hope, even as he is confined by it.
-- Jane S. Gerber (Editor), The Illustrated History of the Jewish People

Origin:
Apposite comes from Latin appositus , past participle of apponere , "to set or put near," from ad- , "to, toward" + ponere , "to put, to place."
__________

I like it but I wonder how many people confuse it with "opposite." That'd give the piece a very different meaning :P

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 Post subject: Re: Word of the Day
PostPosted: Fri Mar 18, 2011 10:31 am 
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truckle
\ TRUHK-uhl \ , intransitive verb;
1. To yield or bend obsequiously to the will of another; to act in a subservient manner.
noun:
1. A small wheel or roller; a caster.

Quote:
I am convinced that, broadly speaking, the audience must accept the piece on my own terms; that it is fatal to truckle to what one conceives to be popular taste.
-- Sidney Joseph Perelman, quoted in "The Perelman Papers," by Herbert Mitgang, New York Times , March 15, 1981

Origin:
Truckle is from truckle in truckle bed (a low bed on wheels that may be pushed under another bed; also called a trundle bed ), in reference to the fact that the truckle bed on which the pupil slept was rolled under the large bed of the master. The ultimate source of the word is Greek trokhos , "a wheel."
____________

I like it. Even though it totally doesn't "sound like" the first definition :)

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 Post subject: Re: Word of the Day
PostPosted: Fri Mar 18, 2011 3:24 pm 
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It sounds like a kind of walking. To truckle along the road.

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 Post subject: Re: Word of the Day
PostPosted: Fri Mar 18, 2011 3:42 pm 
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First thing it made me think of was this.

I'm such a dork.

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 Post subject: Re: Word of the Day
PostPosted: Mon Mar 21, 2011 11:15 am 
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Wow, I've missed THREE WotD's? Gahhh.

Okay, "blandishment" - I like the word - the sound of it makes me think of blanched almonds - offering blanched almonds to gain a boon...okay, I am overworked and underpaid :P

"Apposite" - not so fond of this for the very reason that Kally stated. However, it's easy to remember the meaning, which is opposite of "opposite." Nice little circle there.

"Truckle" - I didn't know that truckle bed and trundle bed were the same thing. I have been using trundle bed incorrectly all these years. Gahhhhhh! :(

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 Post subject: Re: Word of the Day
PostPosted: Mon Mar 21, 2011 12:38 pm 
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It would've been more than three if I was on the ball & did it every day ;)

Anyone who doesn't know todays?...

prescience
\ PREE-shuns; PREE-shee-uns; PRESH-uns; PRESH-ee-uns; PREE-see-uns; PRES-ee-uns \ , noun;
1. Knowledge of events before they take place; foresight.
-- prescient adjective

Quote:
As a professor, he earned a reputation for prescience when he returned an examination to a student named John Grisham with the comment, "Although you missed most of the legal issues, you have a real talent for fiction."
-- "The Final Refrains of 'Dixie'", New York Times , November 11, 1998

Origin:
Prescience is from Latin praescientia, from praescio, praescire, to know beforehand, from prae, before + scio, scire, to know.

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 Post subject: Re: Word of the Day
PostPosted: Mon Mar 21, 2011 3:21 pm 
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Wow, what a lot of ways to pronounce it. I use the last two.

I know it...I do it :P

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 Post subject: Re: Word of the Day
PostPosted: Mon Mar 21, 2011 3:36 pm 
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I generally use the fourth or the last :D (You know how many times I sat here whispering it to myself before I figured that out? Good thing I'm off in a little room by myself this afternoon :P)

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 Post subject: Re: Word of the Day
PostPosted: Mon Mar 21, 2011 7:37 pm 
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Kallysti wrote:
I generally use the fourth or the last :D (You know how many times I sat here whispering it to myself before I figured that out? Good thing I'm off in a little room by myself this afternoon :P)



I use the last one, typically, and I was whispering it to myself too! :P

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 Post subject: Re: Word of the Day
PostPosted: Mon Mar 28, 2011 1:11 pm 
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afflatus

af-fla-tus, noun. /əˈflātəs/, /uh-FLAY-tuhs/

afflatuses, plural

1. Divine inspiration, a divine creative impulse or inspiration.

Example:
The miraculous spring that nourished Homer's afflatus seems out of reach of today's writers, whose desperate yearning for inspiration only indicates the coming of an age of "exhaustion.
-- Benzi Zhang, "Paradox of origin(ality)", Studies in Short Fiction , March 22, 1995


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